Hereford College, at the University of Virginia, is a residential college inspired by the paradigm of Jefferson’s Academic Village.

Hereford College, at the University of Virginia, is a residential college inspired by the paradigm of Jefferson’s Academic Village. Students and faculty live, socialize, and dine together, providing a sense of community and enriching the life of the student at the University. The site is adjacent to a group of dormitories built in 1984 on a mountainous site somewhat removed from the historic center of the University. Because of the topography and the architects’ belief that one can remain contextual without actually copying precedent, the traditional aspects of this project are not derived directly from the “Jeffersonian” architecture, but are a new interpretation of collegiate residential living.

This project was designed in conjunction with the firm Tod Williams + Billie Tsien, of New York City. Hereford College houses 536 students, 3 faculty residents and the family residence of the principal of the College within its five housing units. Classrooms, a library, faculty office, a separate dining faculty, and an amphitheater were built, creating a self-sufficient campus.

Student rooms are linked at the school by a Grounds Wide Information System, creating a high-tech academic village connected by computers. Balancing this state-of-the-art technology, the dormitory provides an environment that, like Jefferson’s, is conducive to interaction between students and faculty, study, and activities involving art, music, lectures, seminars and cultural events. The dining facility serves as a social gathering place for students and faculty.

Hereford College, at the University of Virginia, is a residential college inspired by the paradigm of Jefferson’s Academic Village. Students and faculty live, socialize, and dine together, providing a sense of community and enriching the life of the student at the University. The site is adjacent to a group of dormitories built in 1984 on a mountainous site somewhat removed from the historic center of the University. Because of the topography and the architects’ belief that one can remain contextual without actually copying precedent, the traditional aspects of this project are not derived directly from the “Jeffersonian” architecture, but are a new interpretation of collegiate residential living.

This project was designed in conjunction with the firm Tod Williams + Billie Tsien, of New York City. Hereford College houses 536 students, 3 faculty residents and the family residence of the principal of the College within its five housing units. Classrooms, a library, faculty office, a separate dining faculty, and an amphitheater were built, creating a self-sufficient campus.

Student rooms are linked at the school by a Grounds Wide Information System, creating a high-tech academic village connected by computers. Balancing this state-of-the-art technology, the dormitory provides an environment that, like Jefferson’s, is conducive to interaction between students and faculty, study, and activities involving art, music, lectures, seminars and cultural events. The dining facility serves as a social gathering place for students and faculty.

Because of the topography and the architects’ belief that one can remain contextual without actually copying precedent, the traditional aspects of this project are not derived directly from the “Jeffersonian” architecture, but are a new interpretation of collegiate residential living.
Because of the topography and the architects’ belief that one can remain contextual without actually copying precedent, the traditional aspects of this project are not derived directly from the “Jeffersonian” architecture, but are a new interpretation of collegiate residential living.
Because of the topography and the architects’ belief that one can remain contextual without actually copying precedent, the traditional aspects of this project are not derived directly from the “Jeffersonian” architecture, but are a new interpretation of collegiate residential living.

“With the strong steel portico and sloping glass walls of the dining hall and startling wedge of the house at the top, the whole thing adds up to the first 20th century project at the University that truly engages Thomas Jefferson’s [work]. It is more different from Jefferson than anything that has been built at the University in generations, but it rises to challenge him.”

– Paul Goldberger “Jefferson’s Legacy: Dialogues with the Past.” Architecture View, The New York Times
Because of the topography and the architects’ belief that one can remain contextual without actually copying precedent, the traditional aspects of this project are not derived directly from the “Jeffersonian” architecture, but are a new interpretation of collegiate residential living.
Because of the topography and the architects’ belief that one can remain contextual without actually copying precedent, the traditional aspects of this project are not derived directly from the “Jeffersonian” architecture, but are a new interpretation of collegiate residential living.

Client: University of Virginia

Location: Charlottesville, VA

Discipline: Residence Life

Completion: 1992

Size: 250,000 SF